39 Ancient board games from around the world.

All of these boards were created by artist, Juan Carlos Salazar in Lima, Peru. Up until recently, Mr. Salazar had all of these boards available for purchase on Etsy under the username, "Kurna Ancient Games", for ~$90 each but, unfortunately, he has taken the page down, presumably because he decided to stop making them. I planned on buying the Halatafl and 12 Men's Morris boards from him but the page was taken down before I saved up enough.

Most of the descriptions for each game in this post were either copied directly or summarized from Wikipedia.

Shisima (Kenya, Africa, Tiriki tribe) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Shisima (Kenya, Africa, Tiriki tribe)

Shisima is a two-player abstract strategy game from Kenya. It is related to tic-tac-toe, but even more related to Tapatan, Three Men's Morris, Nine Holes, Achi, Tant Fant, and Dara, because pieces are moved on the board to create the 3 in-a-row. Unlike those other games, Shisima uses an octagonal board.
Rules:
1. Players decide what colors to play, and who will start first.

2. Each player's three pieces are initially next to each other in a row on the perimeter points of the octagon facing opposite the other player's three pieces which are also next to each other in a row on the perimeter of the octagon. This leaves three empty spaces left. One empty space is the middle of the board. The other two empty spaces separate the two rows of pieces on both sides.

3. Each piece can move one space at a time following the pattern on the board. Only one piece can be moved per turn.

4. Repeating a position three times is a draw.
Bear (Ancient Rome) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Bear (Ancient Rome)

Bear is category of board games found in Ancient Rome. I don't know what this specific version is called but in all Bear games there are 3 "hunters" (white) and one "bear" (black). The hunters attempt to trap the bear by blocking its movements while the bear attempts to out-maneuver the hunters.

Rules:
1. Initial positions of the pieces vary depending upon the variant. Usually the bear is placed in the middle of the board, and the hunters are placed together on one end of the board. One player plays the hunters (normally three pieces), and the other player plays the bear.

2. Both hunters and bears move one space at a time following the pattern on the board. Only one piece may be moved by each player. Players alternate their turns. There are no captures in this game.

3. As an optional rule, if the hunters cannot stalemate the bear in a given number of moves, e.g. 40 moves, the bear wins.
Terni Lapilli (Ancient Rome) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Terni Lapilli (Ancient Rome)

This version is identical to Tic-Tac-Toe, though it is believed that Terni Lapilli was actually played with 3 pieces. The rules to this game have been lost with time.
Jarmo / Jasir (Europe) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Jarmo / Jasir (Europe)

Jarmo is a two-player abstract strategy board game. According to Tartarian and Polish legend, Batu Khan, the grandson of Genghis Khan, carried this game (or a variant of it) around during his military campaigns. Supposedly, he would play at least one game before a battle in order to prepare himself. This version is called Jasir.

In this game, a player attempts to place as many of their pieces onto the other player's first row. At the same time, the player tries to capture as many of the other player's pieces on the way.

Goal:
The player with the most points wins. Two points are awarded for every archer that makes it to the other player's first row. One point is awarded for every archer remaining on the rest of the board. If both player's have the same amount of points, then the game is a draw.

Rules:
1. The players first decide who will play the black archers, and who will play the white archers. They also decide who will start first.

2. The players then place their five archers on the row nearest them which is also called the first row (or first rank).

3. An archer may move along a marked line onto a hole. If the hole is occupied by an enemy archer, the enemy archer is removed from the board (the enemy archer may be played back into the game at a later time under certain circumstances - please refer to rule 7). The player's archer is then marked with a white or black line. If that same archer captures another enemy archer no additional markings are added. Captures are not compulsory.

4. No more than one archer can occupy any one hole at a time. Only one archer may be moved on a player's turn. Players alternate their turns in this game.

5. Unlike Jasir, the archers in Jarmo can move forward, backward, laterally on any marked line. In Jasir, archers cannot move backwards.

6. Archers that make it to the other player's first row can no longer move backward to re-enter the rest of the board behind them. They must stay there for the remainder of the game unless they are captured by an enemy archer that moves backwards onto it.

7. As mentioned earlier, a marked archer is one that has captured at least one enemy archer. When a marked archer reaches the enemy's first row, they allow for the player to take back one of their captured pieces from the enemy player, and place it on any available hole on the player's first row. If no holes are available on that turn, then the player must wait to place it on their next opportunity.

8. The game ends, when any one player has brought all of their remaining archers on the board onto the enemy player's first row. The first player do so will count two points for every archer on the enemy player's first row. The other player also counts two points for every archer on the enemy player's first row, but only one point for every archer remaining on the rest of the board. The player with the most points wins.

9. Due to the asymmetry of the board game, it is suggested that a second game be played with players switching sides. Points are then added together from the two games, and the winner is the player with the most points.

10. In order to avoid some unnecessary draws, a player cannot move an archer back and forth between two holes in four consecutive turns.
Five Field Kono (Korea) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Five Field Kono (Korea)

Five Field Kono is a Korean abstract strategy game. As in Chinese checkers, a player wins by moving all of their pieces into the starting locations of their opponent's pieces.

The players take turns moving one of their pieces one square diagonally. The first player to move all of their pieces to their opponent's starting squares wins.
Mu Torere (Polynesia, Maori tribes) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Mu Torere (Polynesia, Maori tribes)

Mū tōrere is a board game played mainly by the Māori people from the east coast of New Zealand’s North Island. It is one of two board games that the Māori people are known to have played before their country became part of the British Empire.

Each player controls four counters or perepere. They are initially placed on the board at the kewai – the eight end-points of the star. At the beginning of the game the middle point, or pūtahi, is empty.

Players move one of their counters per turn to an empty point. Players can move only to an adjacent kewai, and can move to the pūtahi only when the moved counter is adjacent to an opponent's counter. The player who blocks all the opponent's counters from moving is the winner.
Jul-Gonu (Korea) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Jul-Gonu (Korea)

Jul-Gonu is a two-player abstract strategy board game from Korea. It is one of many Gonu games. The game has a relatively small board (4 x 4 square board), and yet offers a challenge at different levels. The game could be played on a larger board, however, it tends to be tiresome. Jul means "lines", and the lines of the board are often drawn on the ground. The game is also referred to as "Ne-Jul-Gonu" i.e. "Four Lines Gonu", referring to the four lines in each direction.

A player wins if he or she reduces their opponent's pieces to one, or stalemates their opponent's pieces by not allowing them to move on their turn.
Umul Gonu (Korea) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Umul Gonu (Korea)

Another version of Gonu.
Pat Gonu (Korea) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Pat Gonu (Korea)

Yet another version of Gonu.
Sz'kwa (Taiwan) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Sz'kwa (Taiwan)

Sz'kwa is a Taiwanese 2-player abstract game where the goal is to capture the enemy's pieces.

Rules:
1. The board is empty in the beginning.

2. Players decide what colors to play, and who starts first.

3. Players drop one of their pieces on any vacant intersection point on the board. Only one piece can be dropped per turn. Players alternate their turns.

4. Enemy piece(s) can be captured as long as the enemy piece(s) are surrounded completely by the player's pieces.

5. The game ends when there are no more vacant intersection points to drop a piece onto, or when one player has exhausted all their pieces.
Halatafl (Viking Game) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Halatafl (Viking Game)

Halatafl is Nordic game very similar to checkers. The goal of the game is to get one of your pieces into one of your opponent's corners or to reduce your opponent's pieces to less than 5. Pieces can be moved in any direction except diagonal. If a capture is possible it must be made. This rule adds another level of strategy to the game as it can be used to eliminate enemy pieces in dangerous positions on the board by sacrificing one of your own. However, by doing so your overall defense weakens.
Tahir (Afghanistan) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Tahir (Afghanistan)

I can't find anything on this game but I believe it is similar to the popular Triangle Peg Game.
Len Choa (Thailand) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Len Choa (Thailand)

Len Choa is a two-player abstract strategy game observed in 19th-century Siam. It is a Leopard hunt game (or Leopard game). One tiger is going up against six leopards. The leopards attempt to surround and trap the tiger while the tiger attempts to capture enough of them (usually 3) so that the leopards can not immobilize the tiger. It is unknown how old the game is, however, the game was published by Captain Low in the periodical Asiatic Researches, 1836.

Goal:
Leopards win if they surround and immobilize the one tiger. That is, the tiger can not move on its turn. The tiger wins if it captures three leopards, as there are not enough of them to immobilize the tiger.

Rules:
1. Players decide what animal to play. Players alternate their turns throughout the game. The board is empty in the beginning with the exception to the tiger piece which is placed on the top vertex of the triangle (the top vertex is the corner of the triangle where the vertical line running down the length of the triangle dissects it).

2. The Leopards start first. All six leopard pieces must be dropped first before any of them can be moved. Only one leopard piece can be dropped per turn, and they are dropped onto any vacant point on the board during the Leopard's turn.

3. The Tiger on its turn may either move the tiger one space onto a vacant point following the pattern on the board, or use it to capture a leopard piece.

After all the leopards have been dropped, a leopard can move one space per turn onto a vacant point following the pattern on the board. Only one leopard may be moved per turn. Unlike the tiger, leopards can not capture.

4. The tiger captures a leopard by the short leap as in draughts. The tiger must be adjacent to the leopard, and leap over it onto a vacant point on the other side following the pattern on the board. Only one capture is allowed per turn. Captures are not compulsory.
Konane (Hawaii) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Konane (Hawaii)

Kōnane is a two-player strategy board game from Hawaii. It was invented by the ancient Hawaiian Polynesians. The game begins with all the counters filling the board in an alternating pattern of black and white. Players then hop over one another's pieces, capturing them similar to checkers. The first player unable to capture is the loser; his opponent is the winner.
Pong Hau K'i (China) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Pong Hau K'i (China)

Pong Hau K'i is a Chinese traditional board game for two players.
The board consists of 5 vertices and 7 edges. Each player has two pieces. Players take turns to move. At each turn, the player moves one of his two pieces into the adjacent vacant vertex. If a player can't move, he loses.

Only one type of position can make a player lose. If both players play perfectly, the game continues endlessly with no winner. It is a children's game in both China and Korea, and is often used for childhood education.
Helga (Libyan Desert, Sahara, Africa) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Helga (Libyan Desert, Sahara, Africa)

Can't find anything about this one.
Picaria (New Mexico, Tigua Indians) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Picaria (New Mexico, Tigua Indians)

Picaria is a two-player abstract strategy game from the Zuni Native American Indians or the Pueblo Indians of the American Southwest. It is related to tic-tac-toe, but more related to Tapatan, Nine Holes, Achi, Tant Fant, and Shisima, because pieces can be moved to create the three-in-a-row. Picaria is an alignment game.

There are two variations to Picaria. The first version is simpler with 9 spaces or intersection points, and the second version uses 13 spaces or intersection points. The rules are the same.

Goal:
To create a three-in-a-row of one's pieces either horizontally, vertically, or diagonally.

Rules:
1. The board is empty in the beginning.

2. Players decide what colors to play, and who will start first.

3. Drop phase: Each player drops one piece per turn on any vacant space on the board except the center (central intersection point). Players alternate their turns. Pieces cannot move until all three pieces of a player have been dropped.

4. Move phase: After each player's three pieces have been dropped on the board, each piece can move one space at a time following the pattern on the board including to the center. Only one piece can be moved per turn.

5. Players can create the three-in-a-row at either the drop phase or move phase, and win the game.
Hare and Hounds (Europe) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Hare and Hounds (Europe)

Hare games are two-player abstract strategy board games that were popular in medieval northern Europe up until the 19th century. In this game, a hare is trying to get past three dogs who are trying to surround it and trap it. The three dogs are represented by three pieces which normally start on one end of the board, and the hare is represented by one piece that usually starts in the middle of the board or is dropped on any vacant point in the beginning of the game.

Hare games are similar to Bear games and hunt games. One side has more pieces than the other with the larger side attempting to hem in the smaller side. The smaller side though is usually compensated with more powers. Where Hare games differ is that the hares can only move forward or sideways, and not backwards. The hunters in the Bear games can move in all directions. Furthermore, the dog in the Hare games cannot capture any of the hares, unlike the tigers, leopards, jaguars, and foxes in the hunt games which can capture their respective prey counterparts.

1. Players decide which animal to play. Depending on the versions, the hounds will usually be placed on one end of the board while the hare will be placed in the middle of the board or dropped onto any vacant point on the board in the first move.

2. It is unknown exactly which animal traditionally starts first, and it may actually depend on which Hare game version is played, or perhaps there was no traditional first player, and it was up to the players themselves to decide who goes first. Players alternate their turns.

3. Hounds can only move straight forward, diagonally forward, or sideways. They cannot move backwards in any way. They can only move one space per turn onto a vacant point, and follow the pattern on the board. Only one hound can be moved per turn. There are no captures in this game by either the hounds or the hare.
The hare can move one space in any direction onto a vacant point following the pattern on the board.

4. If the hare successfully passes the three hounds or reaches the other end of the board, the hare wins. If the hounds surround and immobilize the hare, the hounds win.
Gavalata (Southern India) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Gavalata (Southern India)

Can only find mentionings.
Fox and Geese (Britain) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Fox and Geese (Britain)

Player's toss a coin to decide who will play the fox - the geese move first. Players take turns to move a goose or the fox to an adjacent point along a line. However, the geese are restricted to being able to move directly forwards, diagonally forwards or sideways only.

Upon the fox's turn, if a goose is adjacent to the fox with an empty point directly behind, the fox may capture that goose by hopping over it into the empty square and removing the smitten goose from the board.

Captured pieces are never replayed onto the board and remain captured for the remainder of the game. The game is finished when a player loses either by being reduced to two pieces or by being unable to move.
El Coyote (Mexico) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

El Coyote (Mexico)

El Coyote is a Mexican 2 player game similar to Fox and the Geese but in a different configuration.

The coyote wins if:
If more than three sheep are jumped (eaten)

The Sheep win if:
If they can corner the coyote in any one of the four corners.
Felli (Morocco) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Felli (Morocco)

Felli is a two-player abstract strategy board game from Morocco.

Goal:
The goal of each player is to capture all the other player's pieces, or stalemate the other player by immobilizing its pieces.

Rules:
1. Players decide what colors to play, and who starts first.
In the beginning, each player's six pieces are set up on their respective triangle. The only vacant point is the common vertex which is also the middle point of the board.

2. A piece is moved one space (in any direction) per turn onto a vacant point following the pattern on the board.

3. A piece captures an enemy piece by the short leap as in draughts. The player's piece must be adjacent to the enemy piece, leap over it, and land onto a vacant point on the other side. The leap must be in a straight line and follow the pattern on the board. Captured pieces are removed from the board.

4. Only one piece may be used to move or capture per turn. Players alternate their turns throughout the game.
Shara Vyooha (India) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Shara Vyooha (India)

I can only find mentioning of this one. Can't find anything on the rules.
Escalier (India) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Escalier (India)

Apparently Google doesn't like Indian board games. I can't find anything about this one either.
12 Men's Morris / Morabaraba (Ancient Rome) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

12 Men's Morris / Morabaraba (Ancient Rome)

12 Men's Morris is a variant of 9 Men's Morris where players are each given 12 pieces. This variant is especially popular in South Africa.

The game proceeds in three phases:

1. Placing men on vacant points

2. Moving men to adjacent points

3. (optional phase) Moving men to any vacant point when a player has been reduced to three men

Phase 1: Placing pieces
The game begins with an empty board. The players determine who plays first, then take turns placing their men one per play on empty points. If a player is able to place three of his pieces in a straight line, vertically or horizontally, he has formed a mill and may remove one of his opponent's pieces from the board and the game. Any piece can be chosen for the removal, but a piece not in an opponent's mill must be selected, if possible.

Phase 2: Moving pieces
Players continue to alternate moves, this time moving a man to an adjacent point. A piece may not "jump" another piece. Players continue to try to form mills and remove their opponent's pieces in the same manner as in phase one. A player may "break" a mill by moving one of his pieces out of an existing mill, then moving the piece back to form the same mill a second time (or any number of times), each time removing one of his opponent's men. The act of removing an opponent's man is sometimes called "pounding" the opponent. When one player has been reduced to three men, phase three begins.

Phase 3: "Flying"
When a player is reduced to three pieces, there is no longer a limitation on that player of moving to only adjacent points: The player's men may "fly", "hop", or "jump" from any point to any vacant point.

The game sounds complicated but it is actually very easy to learn and one of my favorites!

AKA: The only good part of Assassin's Creed 3.
6 Men's Morris (Europe) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

6 Men's Morris (Europe)

Same rules as 12 Men's Morris, less spaces, 6 pieces each.

Basically, these games are Tic-Tac-Toe on steroids.
Quirkat / Alquerque (Egypt, 1,400 B.C.) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Quirkat / Alquerque (Egypt, 1,400 B.C.)

Alquerque (also known as Qirkat) is a strategy board game that is thought to have originated in the Middle East. It is considered to be the parent of draughts (US and South Africa: checkers) and Fanorona.

Goal:
To eliminate the opponent's pieces.

Rules:
1. A piece can move from its point to any adjacent point as long as that point is empty.

2. A piece can jump over an opposing piece and remove it from the game, if that opposing piece is adjacent and the point beyond it is empty.

3. Multiple capturing jumps are permitted, and indeed compulsory if possible.

4. If a capture is possible it must be made, or else the piece is removed (or huffed).
Seega (Egypt) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Seega (Egypt)

There are many varieties of Seega. I'm not sure what version this board is but the rules are very similar to checkers.
Choko (Gambia Valley, Africa) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Choko (Gambia Valley, Africa)

Choko is a two-player abstract strategy board game from Gambia Valley, West Africa. It is played specifically by the Mandinka and Fula tribes. It is related to Yote.

Goal:
To capture all of your opponent's pieces

Rules:
1. The board is empty in the beginning. Players decide what colors to play, and who starts first. Players alternate their turns.

2. Players first drop their pieces. They drop one piece per turn.

3. The first player drops their first piece anywhere on the board. The first player has the drop initiative. It is not necessary to drop on every turn, but as long as the first player continues to drop, then so does the second player.

If the first player decides to make a move (non-capturing move or capturing move), then the second player has the option to drop or move. If the second player decides to drop, then he or she has the drop initiative until he or she decides to move. This means that the first player must continue to drop as long as the second player continues to drop.

However, if the second player had made a move instead, then the first player has the option to drop or move, and has the drop initiative.

4. In a non-capturing move, pieces can move orthogonally one space per turn. Only one piece can be moved per turn.

5. In a capturing move, pieces capture similarly as in Draughts by the short leap, except they must capture orthogonally (not diagonally). The player's piece must be adjacent to the enemy piece, and leap over it onto a vacant space on the other side. Only one leap is allowed, and therefore only one capture by this method is allowed. The player, however, is to take another enemy piece from anywhere on the board. Therefore, in a capturing move, two enemy pieces are taken each time.

6. After all pieces have been dropped, the second player moves first.
Dara / Darrah (Nigeria, Africa) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Dara / Darrah (Nigeria, Africa)

Dara is a 2 player clever alignment game like Tic-Tac-Toe but far more complex. It is played in several countries of West Africa. In Nigeria it is played by the Dakarkari people. It is popular in Niger among the Zarma, who call it dili.

Goal:
To form three-in-a-rows, and eliminate enough of your opponent's pieces that he or she can no longer form three-in-a-rows.

Rules:
1. Players decide among themselves who starts first. It is completely arbitrary which player starts first.

2. The board is empty in the beginning. Players take turn placing their stones onto the empty cells of the square board. This is known as Phase 1 of the game or the Drop phase.

3. After all 24 stones have been dropped, Phase 2 or the Move phase begins. Players will then take turns moving their pieces orthogonally into an adjacent empty cell.

4. Players attempt to make a three-in-a-row with their own pieces. The three-in-a-row must be orthogonal and not diagonal. Furthermore, it must be strictly three pieces in a row, and not four or more pieces in a row; four or more pieces formed in-a-row are illegal. If a three-in-a-row is made by a player, he or she can remove one enemy piece from the board which is not part of a three-in-a-row itself.

5. If a player can no longer make three-in-a-rows with their remaining pieces (e.g. if the player only has two pieces left), he or she is the loser, and the other player is the winner.

6. Please note that three-in-a-rows made during the Drop phase do not count. Therefore, a player cannot remove another player's stone during the Drop phase even if one were to make a three-in-a-row. (In Niger, it is not allowed to make a three-in-a-row during the Drop phase.) Moreover, the rule that four or more pieces in a row are illegal to form also applies in the Drop phase.

7. Lastly, if a player were to successfully form two three-in-a-rows in one move during the Move phase, only one enemy piece can be removed.
Viking Solitaire (Europe, Viking Game) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Viking Solitaire (Europe, Viking Game)

I doubt this game is actually called Viking Solitaire. I can't find anything about it.
Liberian Queah (Liberia, Africa) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Liberian Queah (Liberia, Africa)

Liberian Queah is a two-player abstract strategy game from Liberia. It is specifically from the Queah tribe. The game is somewhat related to draughts, Alquerque, Yote, and Choko. Pieces are captured by the short leap. It is specifically related to Yote and Choko in that pieces are dropped on the board. However, there is no removal of an additional enemy piece when a player captures an enemy piece. Liberian Queah could be considered a "game isolate". It cannot truly be classified with any other game.

Goal:
A player wins when they capture all of their opponent's pieces.

Rules:
1. Players decide what colors to play, and who starts first.

2. Players initially place four of their pieces on the four squares nearest them and to their right. Each player's remaining six pieces are set aside next to the board.

3. Players alternate their turns. Only one piece may be moved or used to capture an enemy piece per turn.

4. A piece moves one space per turn orthogonally along the slanted or diagonal square board onto a vacant space.

5. A player's piece can capture an enemy piece by the short leap. The player's piece must be adjacent to the enemy piece, and land on a vacant space on the other side. The capture must be done in an orthogonal direction following the slanted or diagonal design of the board. Only one enemy piece can be captured per turn. A captured piece is removed from the board.

6. If a player's piece has been captured, then the player at the beginning of his or her next turn must take one piece from their reserve, and drop it on any vacant space. A player's number of pieces on the board must always be restored to four, unless of course the player has exhausted their reserve. Please note though, that a player can only drop a piece from their reserve, if one of their pieces was captured on the opponent's last turn.
Wash'kasi (Keres Tribe, New Mexico) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Wash'kasi (Keres Tribe, New Mexico)

All I can find is that it is a race game.
Bagh Chal (The Himalayas, India) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Bagh Chal (The Himalayas, India)

Bagh Chal is a strategic, two-player board game that originates in Nepal. The game is asymmetric in that one player controls four tigers and the other player controls up to twenty goats. The tigers 'hunt' the goats while the goats attempt to block the tigers' movements.

Rules:
At the start of the game all four tigers are placed on the four corners of the grid, facing the center. All goats start off the board.

The pieces must be put at the intersections of the board lines and moves follow these lines.

The player controlling the goats moves first by placing a goat onto a free intersection on the board. Then it is the tigers' turn. One tiger is then moved to an adjacent position along the lines that indicate the valid moves. Moves are alternate between players.

Tigers capture goats by jumping over them to an adjacent free position (as in checkers, although capturing is not obligatory in Bagh-Chal). Goats can not move until all 20 have been put on the board.

The tigers must move according to these rules:

1. They can move to an adjacent free position along the lines.
2. They can start capturing goats any moment after the match has started.
3. They can capture only one goat at a time.
4. They can jump over a goat in any direction, but it must be to an adjacent intersection following any of the lines drawn on the board.
5. A tiger cannot jump over another tiger.

The goats must move according to these rules:

1. They can move to an adjacent position along the lines after all 20 have been put on the board.
2. They must leave the board when captured.
3. They can not jump over the tigers or other goats.
4. The tigers win once they have captured five goats. Goats try to avoid being captured (jumped over) and they win by blocking the tigers' moves till they are unable to move.

Sometimes the game can fall into a repetitive cycle of positions. Goats especially may use this resort to defend themselves against being captured. To avoid this situation, an additional rule has been established: when all the goats have been placed, no move may return the board to a situation that has already occurred during the game.
Tsoro Yematatu (Zimbabwe, Africa) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Tsoro Yematatu (Zimbabwe, Africa)

Tsoro Yematatu is a two-player abstract strategy game from Zimbabwe. Players first drop their three pieces onto the board, and then move them to create a 3 in-a-row which wins the game. It is similar to games like Tapatan, Achi, Nine Holes, Shisima, and Tant Fant. However, what makes this game unique is that pieces can jump over each other (without capture) which adds an extra dimension in the maneuverability of the pieces.

Goal:
To be first to create a 3 in-a-row with one's pieces

Rules:
1. The board is empty in the beginning. Players decide what color pieces to play, and who starts first.

2. Each player drops one piece per turn on any vacant point on the board. Players alternate their turns. Pieces cannot be moved until all six pieces have been dropped. Observe that after all pieces have been dropped, there is only one vacant point on the board.

3. A piece can be moved one of two ways: a) A piece can move one space per turn onto a vacant point following the pattern on the board, or b) a piece can jump over another piece (friend or foe) adjacent to it, and land on a vacant point on the other side; the jump must be in a straight line and follow the pattern on the board. There are no captures in this game.

4. The game can last a very long time, and if no one is still able to create the 3 in-a-row, the players can agree to a draw.
Ufuba Wa Ulana (Anjouan, Comoros Islands, Africa) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Ufuba Wa Ulana (Anjouan, Comoros Islands, Africa)

Can't find anything about this one. Looks similar to Egyptian Seega.
Chauka Bara (India) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Chauka Bara (India)

Chowka bhara (also spelt as Chowka Bara) is a two- or four-player board game from India. This game is an example of a partially observable system that involves an element of chance introduced by the roll of a "special" dice and an element of strategy (the strategy being the pawn the player decides to move after the roll of the dice).

Goal:
For a player to win, he/she must move all their pawns to the center square.

Rules:
This game has several intricate rules which need to be followed. Although there are several variations of this game, the following rules are for the standard implementation.

1. A player casts the shells to determine the number of square his/her pawns can move. If a player has cast 1,2 or 3, then he/she needs to choose one of their pawns and move it that many squares along the path designated for that player. The player needs to be able to smartly choose a pawn to move, so that it optimizes his chance of winning the game. If a player has cast either a 4 or an 8, the player will have another turn to cast the dice. The player does not have to move any of his pawns until he has cast 1,2 or 3.

For example if a player casts a 4, he will get another chance to roll the dice. If on the second turn he gets a 3, then the player can move one of his pawns 4 squares and one of his other pawns 3 squares. He can of course choose to move the same pawn (4+3) 7 squares if he wants to. This argument can be extended to the player getting 3 or more consecutive turns.

2. "Hit": Pawns of two different players cannot exist in the same square, other than a "Safe" square, which are marked with an X in the figure. For a 5x5 board this is simply the starting positions of each of the players and the center square. However, for higher dimension boards, more safe squares can be added symmetrically across the board.

So if the pawn of player X lands on the same square of a pawn of player Y, then player X has "hit" player Y. Player Y's pawn is returned to its starting square and this pawn needs to start over. For a player's pawn to progress into the inner squares, he should have "hit" at least one of his opponent's pawns. This condition is imposed on the player and not on his pawn. For example, even if one of the player's pawns has hit one of the opponent's, then all his other pawns will be eligible to enter the inner square. If it so happens that a player cannot move any of his pawns because he has not "hit" any of his opponents, then the player will lose that turn.

3. "Double": It is possible for a player to have two of his pawns in the same square. This is called a "double". If a player forms a double on the outer square, then it blocks the opponent's pawns behind him for one move; i.e. if an opponent's pawn crosses the double, then that move is voided and the opponent loses a turn. However, on the next turn for the same opponent, his pawn can go past (or "cross") the double. This rule is applicable for every opponent of the player in the game. This rule is not valid once the double is formed on the inner squares. For the player forming the double, there are two choices on his subsequent moves. He can "break" the double by moving only one of the pawns in it, or keep the double and advance the pawns together. In case a player has got multiple turns (as he may have thrown 4s and 8s), he can treat the double as one pawn and make it move to one of the values on the dice.

4. Double vs Single: It is not possible for a single pawn to "hit" a double. A player cannot move his single pawn to the same square as an opponent's double. A player cannot move past an opponent's double for 1 move. However, a double can "hit" a single pawn, and make it move back to its home square.

5. Reaching the central square: A pawn needs to reach the central square exactly. For example, if a pawn is 3 squares away from the center and the player throws a 4, then that pawn cannot be moved. If that is the only pawn left for the player to move (which may be because of a variety of reasons such as being blocked by double, or by virtue of being the last pawn left), the player will lose his turn.
Achi (Ghana) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Achi (Ghana)

Achi is a two-player abstract strategy game from Ghana. It is related to tic-tac-toe, but even more related to Tapatan, Three Men's Morris, Nine Holes, Tant Fant, Shisima, and Dara, because pieces are moved on the board to create the 3 in-a-row. It is an alignment game.
Triangle Solitaire / Keops' Pyramid (Origin unknown) - 39 Ancient board games from around the world.

Triangle Solitaire / Keops' Pyramid (Origin unknown)